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F is for Frog!



F is for Frog!

April is National Frog Month! Frog science activities for preschoolers are a wonderful way to teach children about sequence, and develop their skills in observation and critical thinking. Science activities for kindergarten classrooms can be more advanced to meet the level of older learners but they still serve the same purpose: to teach children important science concepts while having fun!

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The Giant Encyclopedia of Science Activities       The Giant Encyclopedia of Preschool Activities for 4 Year Olds

Here are some fun and froggy science activities for preschoolers and kindergarteners you can try today!

 

I Spy Frogs

Book: GIANT Encyclopedia of Preschool Activities for 4 Year Olds

Content: Science

Age: 4 Years Old

Interaction: Large Group

 

Materials:

  • Frog patterns
  • Pen or marker
  • Brown, green and tan construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Clear contact paper or laminate

Instructions:

  1. Explain to the children that frogs can change the color of their skin to match the woods around them to prevent their enemies from seeing them (camouflage).
  2. In advance, use the frog pattern to trace frogs onto brown, green, and tan paper. Make enough so that each child will have five frogs.
  3. Cut out the frogs and laminate them or cover them with clear contact paper.
  4. Go outside and hide the frogs in a wooded area, among trees, picnic tables, leaves, and grass.
  5. Bring the children outside and encourage them to find the frogs.
  6. After each child has found five frogs, help her count them.

 

Fish and Frogs

Book: The GIANT Encyclopedia of Science Activities for Children 3 to 6

Content: Science

Age: 3 through 4 Years Old

Interaction: Large Group

 

Materials:

  • Fish is Fish by Leo Lionni
  • Pocket chart
  • Chart paper or chalkboard
  • Fish and frog reference pictures and informational books

Instructions:

  1. If possible, read a poem or book about frogs.
  2. Invite the children to tell what they know about frogs, ponds, and fish. Record this on a chart or chalkboard. This could be one day’s lesson, or you might continue if interest is high.
  3. Read Leo Lionni’s Fish is Fish. Discuss aspects of the story such as how we all change as we grow, certain animals have to live in certain places to survive, we can still be friends with others even if they are different than we are etc.
  4. Ask the children to list how fish and frogs are different and how they are the same. This can be recorded on a chart or board.
  5. Have animal reference books and picture encyclopedias available in the classroom. Divide the class into small groups. Each group can research one of the following areas: fish life cycle, natural fish food, natural fish enemies, and how frogs are helpful etc. Each group member might have a job such as researcher, recorder, and reporter. Children should be allowed about two days to research and record their findings.

 

When the research is completed each group will have a turn sharing the facts they learn with the class. Visuals such as books and pictures are encouraged. As each group reports orally, record findings on a big poster. 




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