Over/Above

Found In

Printer Friendly

Over/Above

WORDS TO PRACTICE

  • above
  • location
  • over
  • where

GETTING STARTED

  • Sing "The Bear Went Over the Mountain" with the children.

The Bear Went Over the Mountain

  • The bear went over the mountain,
    The bear went over the mountain,
    The bear went over the mountain
    To see what he could see.
    To see what he could see,
    To see what he could see.
    The bear went over the mountain
    To see what he could see.
  • Ask questions to find out what the children know about the words over and above.
  • Tell the children that today they will be learning how the words over and above are used to describe where something is located.
  • Read your favorite book about spatial relationships to the children or select a book from the Story Circle Suggestions below to check out of the library and read.

STORY CIRCLE SUGGESTIONS

  • Fraggles Over, Under and Between by Laurie Berns
  • Over, Under, and Through and Other Spatial Concepts by Tana Hoban

PREPARATION FOR "OVER/ABOVE" ACTIVITIES AND EXPERIENCES

  • none

Language Enrichment Choices*

  • Hang colorful crepe paper streamers, sun catchers, cut-out animals, interesting small toys, and so on above your circle time area. Ask the children to lie on their backs and look at the thingsthat are hanging over their heads or above their heads. Discuss the items and their location.
  • Use the words over and above in sentences. For example, "The light is above the table," or "The streamers are hanging over my head."
  • Teach the children the American Sign Language signs for over and above (Appendix p. 436). Review other signs that the children have learned.

* Toddlers and twos present a wide range of developmental needs, abilities, and interests. For each learning area, select among the following activity and experience choices that are appropriatefor the children in your care.

Physical Development Choices

  • Say "Jack Be Nimble" with the children. Provide a block or an empty toilet paper tube for a candle and encourage the children to jump over the "candlestick" as they say therhyme.

    Jack Be Nimble
    Jack be nimble,
    Jack be quick.
    Jack jump over the candlestick.

  • Play a modified game of "Red Rover, Red Rover." Make a short wall of pillows in the middle of the floor. You stay on one side of the wall and ask the children to go on the other side ofthe wall. Call the children, one at a time, to come over the wall. Say, "Red Rover, Red Rover, let Mandy come over." When you call the children, they should climb over the wall of pillowsand come to you. Be sure to comment on the fact that they are climbing over the pillows.
  • With older twos, sing "Grasshopper" to the tune of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" with the children. Have the children jump one hand over the other as each line of the songis sung. Older twos may enjoy trying a game of Leap Frog after they finish singing the song.

    Grasshopper
    The first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper's back.
    Oh, the first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper's back.
    The first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper's back.
    Oh, the first grasshopper jumped right over the second grasshopper's back.
    They were only playing leapfrog,
    They were only playing leapfrog,
    They were only playing leapfrog,
    When the first grasshopper jumped over the second grasshopper's back.

  • Do the action story, "Going on a Bear Hunt" with the children. Discuss all the things that you could and couldn't go over.

    Going on a Bear Hunt
    We're going on a bear hunt.
    Want to come along?
    Well, come on then.
    Let's go!
    (walk in place)
    Look! There's a river.
    Can't go over it.
    Can't go under it.
    Can't go around it.
    We'll have to go through it.
    (pretend to walk into river, through the water, and onto other bank, then resume walking in place)
    Look! There's a tree.
    Can't go under it.
    Can't go through it.
    We'll have to go over it.
    (pretend to climb up and over tree; then resume walking in place)
    Look! There's a wheat field.
    Can't go over it.
    Can't go under it.
    Can't go around it.
    We'll have to go through it.
    (pretend to walk through field, make swishing sounds with hands against thighs, then resume walking in place)
    Add verses to make the story as long as you want.
    Look! There's a cave.
    Want to go inside?
    Ooh, it's dark in here.
    (look around, squinting)
    I see two eyes.
    Wonder what it is.
    (reach hands to touch)
    It's soft and furry.
    It's big.
    It's a bear! Let's run!
    (retrace steps, running in place, through wheat field, in place, over tree, in place, across river, in place, then stop)
    Home safe. Whew!

Cognitive Development Choices

  • Suspend a beach ball from the ceiling at a height that is just above the children's heads. Invite them to bat the ball by reaching their hands over their heads. "Is the ball over yourhead?"
  • Sing "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star" with the children. Talk about the stars up above the world. Give the children rock salt and let them glue it to black construction paper to make astarry night picture.

    Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are!
    Up above the world so high,
    Like a diamond in the sky.
    Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
    How I wonder what you are!

  • Go outside and watch the clouds pass over the ground. Discuss the location of the clouds. You may want to share the following fingerplay while you are enjoying the clouds.

    Two little clouds one April day (hold both hands in fists)
    Went sailing across the sky. (move fist from left to right)
    They went so fast
    That they bumped their heads,
    (bump fists together)
    And both began to cry. (point to eyes)
    The big round sun came out and said, (make circle with arms)
    "Oh, never mind, my dears,
    I'll send all my sunbeams down
    (wiggle fingers downward like rain)
    To dry your fallen tears."

  • Take a squirt bottle of water outdoors and invite the children to spray the water over the fence.
  • Give the children wadded pieces of paper to toss over a table or over a box.
  • Build a bridge with blocks. Invite the children to drive small cars over the bridge.
  • Problem-solving suggestion: Provide a piece of blue paper to represent a river. Give the children some blocks and a car. Tell them that the people in the car want to get across the river. Askthem how that can happen. They may need some hints. They can build a bridge or a boat with the blocks.

    REFLECTION ON THE DAY

    Ask the children to show you something that is over their heads.
Copyright © 2014 Gryphon House, Inc. All rights reserved.