ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL

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Circle Time Presentation

Tell the children that for the animal unit, they have learned the names of the farm animals in BIG RED BARN, the names of the baby animals from the book by the same title, BABY ANIMALS, and nowthere are many other animals' names they can learn from this book, ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL. Explain that mammals are animals with fur or hair that get nourishment from their mothers and thatbreathe fresh air. Read ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL without pausing to point out all the different animals. Read it a second time, and this time pause to point out all the animals and emphasize theirnames.

STORY STRETCHER

For Art: Colorful Sea, Jungle, Desert Or Plain

What the children will learn-
To represent a variety of habitats where mammals live

Materials you will need-

  • Assorted colors of construction paper
  • white typing paper or manilla paper
  • crayons
  • markers
  • chalk or colored pens

What to do-

  1. With the group of children who choose the art center during free play or choice time, look again at Ruth Heller's illustrations. Talk about what she has added to the pictures that let us knowwhere the animal lives, as branches from trees for the jungle, sprigs of grass for the plain, blue and green backgrounds for the sea and a tan color for the desert.
  2. Ask the children to select a mammal they would like to draw and to decide what they will add to their illustrations to let the people looking at their drawings know where the mammal lives.Brainstorm a few ideas.
  3. Assist the children in getting started, then leave them to work on their own.
  4. Display the "Colorful Sea, Desert, Jungle or Plain" pictures in the science and nature center.

Something to think about-
When young children have experienced a variety of materials, such as crayons, markers, chalks or colored pens, they will begin to select the mediawhich best fits their needs as artists.

STORY STRETCHER

For Library Corner: Learning About Mammals By Listening And Looking

What the children will learn-
To coordinate what they are hearing with illustrations they are seeing

Materials you will need-

  • Cassette tape and recorder

What to do-

  1. Make a tape of yourself reading ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL.
  2. Give directions by describing what the child should be seeing on the page. For example, say, "Open the cover and you will see two pages filled with pictures of snowshoe hares. Turn the pageand you will see a house mouse with four little babies. This is the title page and you can see printed in large letters, ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL by Ruth Heller. Now turn the page again and youshould see some long green leaves and two strange animals at the bottom of the page."
  3. Continue the pattern of telling the listeners what they should be seeing on each page and then reading the text.

Something to think about-
Try to create a variety of listening experiences for the library corner. Include some group listening station tapes, some tapes of music withaccompanying lyrics the child can follow, commercial tapes and those with a variety of different page-turning cues.

STORY STRETCHER

For Mathematics And Manipulatives: How Many Mammals?

What the children will learn-
To count the number of mammals on each set of pages

Materials you will need-

  • Posterboard or chart tablet
  • markers

What to do-

  1. With a small group of children in the mathematics and manipulatives area of the classroom, look again at the pictures in ANIMALS BORN ALIVE AND WELL.
  2. Tell the children that as they look through the book, you want to make a list of how many animals are in the illustrations. Begin with the end paper pages where there is an illustration of howthe snowshoe hare changes his coat for winter, spring, summer and fall. Count the number of hares. Count the number in each row, then the number of rows. Then count to see how many there are alltogether (20).
  3. On the chart tablet or posterboard, write 20 snowshoe hares, 4 house mice, 1 spiny anteater, 1 duckbill platypus, 8 African elephants.
  4. Continue counting the number of animals on each page. Group some of the animals, as mammals with scales or spikes.

Something to think about-
Let younger children touch each picture as they count. Older children may make groups of mammals to count, as marsupials, pets that are mammals,mammals with stripes, mammals with spots, underwater mammals or mammals that fly.

STORY STRETCHER

For Music And Movement: Lumber Like An Elephant

What the children will learn-
To move like different animals

Materials you will need-

  • None needed

What to do-

  1. At the second group time of the day, let the children look through the book and select some mammals whose movements they can imitate. For example, they may lumber along like the elephant, run onall fours with little short steps like a Pekingese, gallop like a zebra, hop like a kangaroo, run fast like a deer.
  2. Decide on a signal, such as a clap of hands, which you will use to tell the children when to start and stop the movement.
  3. Let the children practice their moves as a group. Then, divide them into smaller groups representing different animals and let them all move at your signal. You might have a group of lumberingelephants, hopping kangaroos, running deer and flying bats, who must all look out for each other.

Something to think about-
As an extension, ask the children to predict how they think an animal might move even if they have never seen one. For example, an okapi looks likea cross between a deer and a zebra, so it probably runs and gallops fast.

STORY STRETCHER

For Science And Nature: Grouping Mammals By Habitats

What the children will learn-
To classify mammals by where they live

Materials you will need-

  • Posterboard
  • magnetic tape
  • index card
  • sturdy paper
  • crayons
  • scissors
  • glue
  • optional-clear contact paper or laminating film

What to do-

  1. Divide a large sheet of posterboard into four columns.
  2. Place a long strip of magnetic tape onto the posterboard, extending the length of each column.
  3. At the top of each column, place a symbol to represent each habitat, such as land, trees, underwater and houses. Print the name of the habitat under the symbol.
  4. Construct illustrations of mammals from each habitat by letting the children draw and color pictures of mammals on sturdy paper. Cut out the pictures. Cover with clear contact paper or laminatingfilm, if available. Attach a small strip of magnetic tape to the back of the pictures.
  5. Mix up all the pictures and have the children sort them by attaching a picture under the column which represents that animal's habitat.

Something to think about-
If you teach younger children whose drawing skills are not up to the task of making illustrations which others can recognize easily, then make thesketches yourself or trace them.

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