Goodnight Moon

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Circle Time Presentation

Ask the children who they say goodnight to before they go to bed. After a few brief responses, have the children listen and try to remember all the things the little bunny says goodnight to inGOODNIGHT MOON. After the reading, have the children recall the list of things the bunny told goodnight. (If desired, write each on a chalkboard or a chart tablet. When there is a pause in thelisting, reread the list.) Complete the circle time by having the children tell you things they would like to say goodnight to in their classroom when they take a nap today. (Write their list besidethe bunny's list.)

STORY STRETCHER

For Art: Bunny's Black And White Pictures

What the children will learn-
To make black and white pictures

Materials you will need-

  • Black construction paper
  • white and colored chalk
  • damp sponge
  • bowl of water

What to do-

  1. Call the children's attention to the way the illustrator of GOODNIGHT MOON showed us the bunny was falling asleep. He alternated black and white pages with the colorful ones. Have thechildren close their eyes and notice the color is gone. Call attention to the fact that the little bunny's room was dark, but he still could see the outlines of things in his room.
  2. Place the art supplies on the table in the art center.
  3. Demonstrate how to dampen the paper and make the chalk lines look different when the paper is wet.
  4. Allow much time for exploration. Suggest that some children draw scenes from the little bunny's room or from their own classroom for a GOODNIGHT PRESCHOOL bulletin board.

Something to think about-
Allow young preschoolers to experiment with the difference between using chalk on wet and dry construction paper.

STORY STRETCHER

For Housekeeping And Dress-up Corner: Bunny's Bedroom

What the children will learn-
To role-play naptime routines

Materials you will need-

  • The bedroom area of the housekeeping corner with bed
  • dolls
  • blankets
  • stuffed animals

What to do-

  1. Turn the housekeeping corner bedroom area into a place for the dolls and stuffed animals to nap.
  2. Discuss with the children who choose that center during free play how they can make this a good nap area.
  3. Encourage any child who is having difficulty napping to come to the housekeeping corner and help make the nap area.
  4. Use the baby blankets and soft pillows to create a comfortable spot.

Something to think about-
If the children in your program must nap in the classroom, place the cot of the child who is having difficulty napping near the napping area he created for the dolls and the stuffed animals. Makesure the cot is visible so you also can reassure the child with a smile. Your nearness is comforting.

STORY STRETCHER

For Library Corner : Hey, Diddle, Diddle

What the children will learn-
To recite "Hey, Diddle, Diddle"

Materials you will need-

  • A copy of a nursery rhyme book
  • chart tablet or poster board
  • markers

What to do-

  1. Create a poster of "Hey, Diddle, Diddle."
  2. For the children who come to the library corner during free play time, point out to them that in GOODNIGHT MOON there was a picture on the little bunny's bedroom wall of a cow jumping overthe moon. They will think that is funny.
  3. Then, read to them the nursery rhyme you have printed on a chart tablet or poster board, "Hey, diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle, and the cow jumped over the moon." Print theentire rhyme.
  4. Teach them the nursery rhyme and let them enjoy the absurdity of a cow jumping over the moon and a cat playing a fiddle.
  5. Let the children decorate the poster with their own drawings.
  6. Leave the nursery rhyme poster in the library corner as a reminder of the rhyme they learned.

Something to think about-
Many of the story stretchers can be used for a small group of children or for the entire class. After hearing the children reciting the rhyme, others will want to learn it.
(Adapted from Kathy Carter's classroom.)

ANOTHER STORY STRETCHER

For Library Corner: Rhyming Words

What the children will learn-
To pair rhyming words heard in GOODNIGHT MOON

Materials you will need-

  • None needed

What to do-

  1. For the children who visit the library corner, reread the section of GOODNIGHT MOON where the little bunny is trying to fall asleep and he begins saying rhyming words, "kittens and mittens,toyhouse and mouse, mush and hush, room and moon, bears and chairs, clocks and socks, house and mouse, brush and mush, air and everywhere."
  2. After reading the rhyming section once, pause and let the children supply the words which rhyme.

Something to think about-
The rhyming exercise in the library corner also can be a follow-up activity in another circle time. Some of the children who enjoy rhyming words may not choose the library corner because they areattracted to other activities. Reading to the children in small groups allows them to enjoy the pictures at a more intimate distance than in a large circle. Observe the children during free play, andif an opportunity arises, ask a few children to come to the library. Afterwards, they can return to the activity of their choice .

STORY STRETCHER

For Naptime Saying Goodnight

What the children will learn-
To prepare for naptime

Materials you will need-

  • None needed

What to do-

  1. Help the children remember the things Bunny said goodnight to. Then, have them to whisper to you what they want to say goodnight to in their classroom at naptime.
  2. Let each child say goodnight to one thing by going over and gently touching the object and whispering, "Goodnight ."
  3. Have the children tiptoe back to their cots.
  4. Darken the room a bit and sit within view of any child who seems to need reassurance.
  5. Reread GOODNIGHT MOON in your most relaxing and warm voice.

Something to think about-
Young children who have difficulty napping need clear expectations that regardless of whether they are sleepy or not, naptime will be a rest time with everyone on their cots. However, if you playsome relaxing music or read a relaxing book, then the children who are having difficulty falling asleep at least have something to occupy their thoughts.

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